PROJECTOR EPSON EB-1975W WXGA Wireless 3LCD Multimedia Projector

Stream wirelessly from tablets or smartphones to your widescreen projector

The PowerLite 1975W brings brilliant image quality from your tablet or smartphone to your boardroom with WXGA resolution and DCDi® video processing. Offering 3x Brighter Colors1 than competitive models, Epson 3LCD projectors ensure vivid images. With 5000 lumens of color brightness and 5000 lumens of white brightness2, the 1975W shines bright. Stream content from MHL®-enabled devices. Or, wirelessly share 1080p content via Miracast® or WiDi. Now, it can look as good on the screen as on your device — all up to 300″.

3x Brighter Colors with Epson*
Brilliant image quality requires high color brightness. Epson 3LCD projectors have 3x Brighter Colors than leading competitive projectors*. Delivering 5000 lumens of color brightness1 and 5000 lumens of white brightness1, the PowerLite 1975W uses 3LCD, 3-chip technology for brilliant images with true-to-life color.

Bright and Colorful

Bright and Colorful
Features 5000 lumens of color brightness (color light output)1 and 5000 lumens of white brightness (white light output)

WXGA

WXGA
High-definition 1280 x 800 widescreen resolution

WiDi/Miracast Screen Mirroring

WiDi/Miracast Screen Mirroring
Wireless projection with Miracast from any smartphone, tablet or PC with an Android™ operating system or WiDi for Intel® devices like smartphones, tablets or PCs. Allows any person to share their content.

HDMI with MHL Connectivity

HDMI with MHL Connectivity
Stream 1080p content and mirror your mobile device with MHL, the latest in wired connectivity – Display content from MHL-enabled smartphones and tablets. Charge your MHL-enabled device when it’s connected to the projector.

Auto Screen Fit

Auto Screen Fit
Easily and quickly adjust the image to fit the screen.

Split Screen

Split Screen
Display content from two inputs simultaneously, side by side, on a single screen.
  • 3x Brighter Colors and reliable performance — 3LCD, 3-chip technology*
  • One measurement of brightness is not enough — look for both high color brightness and high white brightness.
    The PowerLite 1975W has:

          Color Brightness: 5000 lumens
        White Brightness: 5000 lumens
  • Brilliant widescreen images up to 300″ — native WXGA resolution and DCDi video processing; also features a 1.6x optical zoom
  • Stream content from your smartphone or tablet — full mirroring capabilities from your mobile device via MHL; or, wirelessly using Miracast or WiDi
  • 2x HDMI™ connectivity — for high-definition video and audio
  • Split Screen — simultaneously project two images, video or still, side by side, from two different sources
  • Remote network monitoring and control — plus Message Broadcasting and built-in schedule functions
  • Multi-PC projection and Moderator function — support BYOD collaboration; connect up to 50 devices to view the display; the moderator can control the presentation and display up to 4 different devices simultaneously
  • PC-free image slideshows — quickly and easily share images and PDFs, without using a computer
  • DICOM® Simulation Mode — ideal for viewing grayscale medical images such as X-rays, for training and educational purposes

Eco Features

  • RoHS compliant
  • Recyclable product
  • Epson America, Inc. is a SmartWay Transport Partner

Buy Epson EB-1975W or other Epson Projector at https://projectorpro.in.th

BenQ MX631ST Short Throw Projector Review

The BenQ MX631ST is a short throw projector intended for use in classrooms or conference rooms.  It is a single chip DLP XGA projector that in its brightest mode is specified to produce 3200 lumens and its lamp is rated to have an unsually long life of up to 10,000 hours, in SmartEco mode.  Even when operated in the full power (i.e, “normal”) mode, the lamp is rated at a fairly long 4,500 hours life.

This is a XGA resolution projector (i.e., 1024 x 768) with a 4 x 3 aspect ratio as is typical for many entry-level business and classroom projectors.  However, since many classrooms and conference rooms are already equipped with 4 x 3 aspect ratio projection screens, the MX631ST is certainly a viable choice when replacing an existing XGA projector.


Highlights

  • Long lamp life – up to 10,000 hours
  • Short throw design supports placement fairly close to the screen (e.g., 1 screen width)
  • Two HDMI inputs, one support MHL 2.0
  • XGA resolution (1024 x 768) and 4 x 3 Aspect Ratio
  • Built-in 10 watt speaker
  • 3D support compatible with Blu-ray 3D sources
  • Produces relatively high image contrast, for this class of projector

Short Throw

Business and classroom projectors in this class typically have zoom lenses with a limited zoom range and the MX631ST is no exception.  Its 1.2:1 zoom ratio is typical, but this model has a relatively short throw ratio of 0.9 to 1.08 meaning when projecting, for example, an 80 inch wide image the projector can be located as close as 72 inches and as far as 86.4 inches from the screen.  Ideally the projector should be placed a little below the bottom of the screen, when table mounted, or a little above the top of the screen, when ceiling mounted.  Using a short throw projector, such as the MX631ST, can be useful in keeping the light from the projector away from the presenter’s or teacher’s eyes when they are standing toward the front of the room, although not to the extent possible with ultra throw projectors.   The bottom line is a short throw model can be the right choice for may conference room or classroom situations.


MHL Support

MHL is essentially mobile HDMI.   The MX631ST supports MHL on its HDMI #2 input.  This allows you to plug in MHL compatible devices such as a Roku stick or a MHL enabled smart phone (however, not tested for this review).   MHL is relatively recent, so it may see a lot more capabilities down the road.  To be effective, since MHL supports video, audio, and command and control, a projector really should have its own sound system and the MX631ST does appear to have these capabilities. MHL allows many people to “cut the cord”.   BenQ specifically says the MHL capabilities of the MX631ST allows you to display pictures, movies and games from MHL enabled Android devices to the big screen


Long Lamp Life

BenQ literature says “Within the SmartEco Lamp Saving Technology umbrella, Lamp Care mode takes your dollars further – much further by offering an astonishing lamp life of up to 10,000 hours!”  Now of course you cannot expect that sort of lamp life if you always run the projector in normal power mode, but it does appear the MX631ST should be among the best in terms of lamp life and only seriously outdone by LED and laser based projectors.  BenQ provide a 1 year warranty (or 2000 hours of use) on the original installed lamp while replacement lamps only carry the standard 90 day warranty.


3D Support

Many low cost DLP projectors lack support for the 3D signal format used by Blu-ray Discs, but this is not the case for the MX631ST.  It is spec’ed to support the most popular 3D signal formats, including the frame packing technique used for Blu-ray.  BenQ did not provide 3D glasses with the review unit and I did not evaluate the 3D capabilities of the projector.

There are Projector shop at https://projectorpro.in.th

BenQ W1070 Home Theater Projector Review

BENQ W1070:  Wow!  3D capable, 1080p, exceptional brightness and the promise of really good color!  Sounds like an expensive projector.  Not true!

Allow me to introduce you to BenQ’s W1070

 

สินค้า Home-Projector BENQ W1070

BenQ W1070 Highlights

  • 2000 lumens bright – suitable for family/living/bonus rooms
  • 3D Capable
  • Higher contrast for better blacks, than most low cost projectors
  • 10 watts of Audio, audio output
  • Full color management controls, ISF certified
  • Minimal lag times for great gaming
  • Remote control
  • Smart-Eco for energy efficiency (see more below)
  • Very long lamp life (for low cost of operation)
  • New lighter 3D glasses from BenQ (not included)
  • Excellent warranty
  • Lowest priced 1080p 3D capable projector we’ve reviewed so far

BenQ W1070 Projector Overview

The BenQ W1070 is a Light Canon of a projector! Mind you, there’s no official determination of how bright a projector has to be to be one, but I’ve referred, in the past to a number of projectors as light canons, that even in their brighest modes, can’t match this 2000 lumen rated BenQ W1070 even after its calibrated.

This is a single chip DLP projector. A small one. Although you can find a few smaller home entertainment projectors that are smaller (all DLP) I can’t think of a single 1080p LCD projector that isn’t dramatically larger.

Physically the W1070 looks pretty cool, or at least cute! But, it’s the picture that we really care about.

I have yet to see an official price. The projector is just starting to arrive in the US, even though it’s been available in Europe and elsewhere for months. In the EU it’s supposed to be $749 last I checked. It turns out that the official US price is $1099. It’s the lowest cost 1080p 3D capable projector yet to grace our theaters.

The projector is just starting to ship in the US as this is published. 3D Glasses are not included. The official price for the glasses is $79. Even that is a little less than most others.

Contrast, it should be noted, is also a lot higher than most of the competiton, which should indicate respectable black levels for the price. Just don’t expect too much in that regard, as projectors with great black levels are typically at least $2500. It’s less of an issue in a typical family room type environment.

Let’s take a quick look at some bullet point highlight, some specs and then we can get into the meat of this projector review!


BenQ W1070 3D

3D looks very good. Before I get going on the BenQ’s 3D I’ve got an interesting story (cautionary tale) before I go further. I’ve been having problems with one of my long cables of late, ordered in someone’s “top of the line” cables (off of Amazon – I was in a real hurry), and when I put on John Carter in 3D last evening, all kinds of crosstalk and judder. Switched back to that truly (but 5 year old), top of the line cable – an Ultralink, and all that garbage went away. I confirmed that the problems also were there when I switched to an expensive JVC projector. BTW the issue was with Blu-ray 3D, side-by-side off of HDTV didn’t seem to suffer.

If you think you are the type who will upgrade in a couple of years (maybe to a 4K projector when they become affordable), that’s a killer reason for buying really good cables.

Back to the 3D performance. With a proper cable, crosstalk is a non-factor. I found watching 3D to be rather enjoyable and relatively bright. Color was pretty good (in 3D), I don’t expect color as good as 2D, and we have never tried to calibrate 3D.  The excellent brightness allowed me to put on some widescreen movies and fill my 124″ diagonal.  Not bad, watchably bright.  At 100″ diagonal there’s plenty of lumens for 3D.  After all, consider that 400 lumens is more than enough (with proper lack of ambient light) to watch a 100″ screen.  With over 1700 lumens calibrated, that’s more than 4 times as much.  3D no longer costs 75% of brightness even if it does cost viewers a good bit more than half the brightness.  Translated, this W1070 can do a great job in 3D on an average sized screen.

I was very pleased with HDTV 3D.  Everything from a Penn State football game, and some little league baseball I recorded in 3D, to a National Parks tour of Arches, looked really good.

Color remained good even in 3D.  Of course we never attempt to calibrate 3D, so I’m sure it could be improved.  If we find a 3D calibration disc, at some point I’ll have Mike calibrate some 3D modes on future projectors.

Overall, very good 3D, lots of brightness, and an almost total lack of rainbow effect  (for me) make this W1070 the best lower cost DLP projector for 3D that I’ve played with.

In other words:  I really like it!


link for Projector BenQ W1070 and Other BenQ Projector here : https://projectorpro.in.th

DLP vs. LCD vs. LCoS Overview

DIGITAL PROJECTION TECHNOLOGIES COMPARED

This article is a major update to similar article from 2008.  While the same three digital projector technologies are still being used today, as they were in 2008, each technology has evolved to provide improved performance and support new capabilities, such a 3D.  This “Overview” section attempts to present a summary of the state of each digital projection technology as well as provide examples of projectors that employ each technology.  The next section provides a more detailed, more technical, discussion of the three digital projection technologies as well pointing out the areas in which each technology excels and where each has performance limitations. The final two sections discuss projector placement considerations and a observations related to a few specific projector performance factors.

This article covers projectors used for business, education and home theater applications, with a emphasis on the latter category, and the underlying digital imaging technologies being used.  These digital imaging technologies include Digital Light Processing (DLP), Liquid Crystal Display (LCD), and Liquid Crystal on Silicon (LCoS).  The following provides a high level overview of each of these technologies and provides examples of projectors using each of these technologies.  More detailed information for each of these projection technologies is provided later in this article.

I would like to offer a few observations as to certain features now available, or soon to become available, on digital projectors that may influence you future decision for a projector purchase.  Such features not unique, or need not be unique, to DLP, LCD or LCoS digital projection technology:

DYNAMIC IRISES

Dynamic irises first came into general use with LCD projectors as a means for improving on these projector’s relatively low native on/off contrast ratio and elevated black levels.  Dynamic irises can now be found in many home theater projectors using DLP, LCoS and 3LCD digital display technologies including those with a relatively good native contrast ratio and low black levels.  One notable exception is JVC who, with their industry leading native on/off contrast ratios of up to 100,000+, have avoided use of dynamic irises in their D-ILA (LCoS) projectors.

LIGHT OUTPUT

A more recent development is dynamic control of the projector’s lamp to facilitate increase light output in 3D mode.  Sony is now using this technique within certain of their SXRD (LCoS) projectors.  This feature may show up in other projectors in the future.

The migration from lamps to solid state light sources (i.e., LEDs and Lasers) has become widespread with the small portable projector’s use of LED light sources.

  • LED light sources have more recently found their way in a few larger business and home theater class projectors, but these are generally limited to only moderate light output.
  • The use of lasers is currently in far more limited use than LEDs.  There are currently a few hybrid DLP business projector models, such as the Panasonic PT-RZ470, that are using LEDs for the red and blue primary colors and with a laser used excite a phosphor target, which in turn emits a green light (i.e., the third primary color).  This hybrid approach is being used as it is difficult to produce green LEDs with enough light output to match what is practical for the red and blue LEDs. This hybrid technique may very well migrate to future home theater projectors.
  • Sony now offers a business projector that uses a blue laser to excite a phosphor target that in turn emits a white light.  This projector has a fairly high light output (rated at 4000 lumens) and it appears the Sony white light laser/phosphor approach can be used more-or-less in updated versions of existing projector designs whose light engine were originally designed around lamp-based light sources.  This approach seems to have some advantages from a cost point of view and will likely be used in future projector models, perhaps including those intended for home theater use.
  • Multiple companies have demonstrated engineering models of projectors that use red, blue and green lasers to individually illuminate the digital imaging chips assigned respectively for the red, blue and green colors.  There are both technical and regulatory issues that must be overcome before such direct use of lasers (i.e., not simply limited to exciting a phosphor target) can gain wide-spread use in projectors intended for the business, education or home theater market.

We have LCD and DLP Projector at https://projectorpro.in.th